Supervised visitation seems on the surface like a kind of punishment for one parent. In reality, however, supervised visitation benefits both the parent who gets it and the children they spend time with during that visitation. 

The family courts in Florida may order supervised visitation for a number of reasons. Perhaps you recently found out that you’re the father of a child and haven’t yet established a relationship with them. Maybe you have a volatile personal history that leads the courts to worry about your parental abilities. Perhaps the whole situation is the result of flagrant lies told by your ex. Instead of refusing supervised visitation, however, learn a bit more about it. Try to embrace it as a stepping stone to greater enjoyment of your parental rights.

Supervised visitation often starts at a state facility – but may not stay there.

As with any other parenting time, your right to supervised visitation will start at a specific time and require you to be at a certain location. Instead of your ex handing over the children to you, you will instead spend time with the children in a location likely owned and operated by the state of Florida. State workers will monitor and assist in your interactions with your children during this time.

You can play games, read books or otherwise just socialize and engage with your children at these facilities. Eventually, your supervised visitation can be expanded. When possible, the state of Florida will start to prepare you for a more significant role in the lives of your children. You may be able to have supervised visitation take place at your home as a way of allowing the state to affirm the safety of your house and your ability to provide for your children. 

Once caseworkers have seen you demonstrate your dedication to your children and feel confident that you can complete the obligations of parenting without presenting a risk to your children, you may have the option for visitation without supervision and eventually shared custody. 

Find out more about your legal options regarding parenting, supervised visitation and father’s rights today.